Latino Townhall’s Top 25 #LatinoQuotes for #2013 – Part I


I’m currently writing a book on Leadership… and these are some thoughts that have surfaced during the first part of 2013:

Joined in business

“Leaders develop foresight by fostering skills in perception and knowledge.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 1st 2013)

“A leader is the first one to show up and the last one to leave; the one who inspires as well as perspires.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 2nd 2013)

“Passion is possessing an extreme focus and dedication towards achieving a goal.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 3rd 2013)

“A masterful leader exerts influence for the purpose of transformation through collaborative effort.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 5th 2013)

“Eternity is just not a place reserved for us; it lives in our hearts and expresses itself through deeds done to others.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 5th 2013)

“You were created as a mystery; an unfolding story revealed through time.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 10th 2013)

“Vision is an invitation to live a stimulating life.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 10th 2013)

“Passion is evident when optimum energy is released, and dynamic synergy is increased.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 11th 2013)

“Leaders enlarge the Kingdom within to influence the world throughout.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 12th 2013)

“The wise shut up long enough for all the stupid people to stop talking.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 12th 2013)

“Leaders create unrestrained atmospheres where followers feel engaged to rise above their limitations.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 26th 2013)

“Influence is a gift and a study; it is acquired through learning and nurtured by growing.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 27th 2013)

“Leaders dwell in the realm called “above and beyond”, making the extraordinary look common.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 27th 2013)

“Leadership is reflecting the values others want in themselves, then communicating a vision commensurate with those values.” –Joel Garcia (Jan. 29th 2013)

“The leader who offers help gives hope.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 1st 2013)

“Significance means, ‘I matter, and have value.’ Purpose is when my journey matters and adds value to others.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 6th 2013)

“A promise is an intangible, until you connect it to a source who can fulfill that promise.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 8th 2013)

“The critical factor in personal development is not what a leader learns but what he or she unlearns in the process of learning.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 10th 2013)

“Chaos is the absence of wisdom.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 12th 2013)

“Influence is the transfer of trust, and with that trust comes power.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 14th 2013)

“If it’s not yours in the first place, you’ve got nothing to lose.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 17th 2013)

“Transition is the ability to perceive change coming, to pause and understand its significance and adapt to it.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 22 2013)

“Leaders who walk in integrity live in controversy.” –Joel Garcia (Feb. 25th 2013)

“A leader’s quest is to turn challenges into solutions.” –Joel Garcia (March 16, 2013)

“Competent leaders create stable and secure working environments.” –Joel Garcia (March 16, 2013)

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Please feel free to copy and paste wherever you like… note, I’ve added the date only to remember the date I came up with these original quotes. I google all my quotes to ensure I am not infringing on anyone’s thoughts, ideas or quotes.

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3 Essential Ingredients for Corporate Change


Lead Change

Let Change Begin

When I think of transitions, both personal and corporate, I can’t help but to think of Joshua’s great task of transitioning a large community from a desert experience into the Promised Land; a land flowing with “milk and honey”. Individuals as well as organizations can learn three simple principles of corporate transition from Joshua’s example. This experience demanded three indispensable ingredients from Joshua. They are:

1. Courage (Mental Fortitude)

Be strong and courageous, because you will lead these people to inherit the land I swore to their fathers to give them. Be strong and very courageous. (Joshua 1:6, 7 NIV)

Courage is a prerequisite for corporate transitions. We commonly refer to this type of change as reorganization or organizational reinvention. Change is not always easy to implement for any leader since it challenges the status quo culture. “Status quo” thinking is embedded in our human nature; we like to keep things the same because change is too costly and demands too much from us. Courage is simply having the mental fortitude to do the right thing, which is to redirect the organization, regardless of the criticism and the obstacles encountered along the way. Corporate leaders leading change must be ready to encounter resistance from all levels. Therefore, mental fortitude to inspire, supervise, collaborate and lead any change effort is required from leaders.

2. Community (Engaging People through Vision and Responsibility)

So Joshua ordered the officers of the people: ‘Go through the camp and tell the people, ‘Get your supplies ready. Three days from now you will cross the Jordan here to go in and take possession of the land the Lord your God is giving you for your own.’ (Joshua 1:10, 11 NIV)

Corporate change must involve the whole community under your care. When you prepare people for change, transitions become, well almost seamless. A leader starts preparing people for change by assessing current and critical resources for the change effort, and establishing timelines for task completion. In other words, what is needed for the journey of change, and how long will it take? From the passage above, the people gathered supplies (resources) for their journey, and set a timeline of three days to accomplish corporate consolidation of these vital resources. The ability to acquire and maintain resources is critical for any change effort. You must know what you have, so you can determine what else you need for the journey. Some things must be eliminated, while new resources and people will emerge to help you with the change process. Effective change occurs when leaders engage their team members through vision and responsibility.

2. Consecration (Personal and Corporate Cleansing)

Joshua told the people, ‘Consecrate yourselves, for tomorrow the Lord will do amazing things among you.’” (Joshua 2:5 NIV)

The most critical element of change is preparing and aligning people with the right attitude for change. This starts with a good communication strategy. Communicating change must permeate the entire organization, every individual must understand his or her particular role in the change effort. Emotions run high during times of transition since the culture is shifting such as positions, responsibilities, position, and new expectations, etc. Therefore, consecration is essential if a team is going to advance with minimal problems. In this process people have to let go of the past by putting petty differences aside.

Consecration is simply looking within for the purpose of critically examining self to remove personal obstacles that will get in the way of change, even admitting our current condition is insufficient for entering the next phase. We must let go of the old paradigms, and find new ways of thinking. Personal and leadership reinvention may be required from you as well. The right attitude for change must be adopted, encouraged and cultivated among all team members from top to bottom.

The community under Joshua’s care was required to prepare and cleanse themselves for transition. Those who cleanse themselves have a higher probability of moving forward while those who don’t may just fall on the way side, meaning the makeup of your team may change. Personal and corporate cleansing is required for transitioning into new beginnings.

What other principles are involved in corporate change?

Latino Education: The Leadership Challenge of the Next Decade


It’s common knowledge by now; the Hispanic population is rapidly increasing in the Southwest region of the United States. Within in the next decade many states will join the state of New Mexico, the first state to boast a majority Hispanic population. We are beyond counting numbers, what’s emerging before us is evident to all. The Latino population is quickly overtaking many school districts, which are inept to deal with specific issues plaguing Hispanics, especially among the children of immigrants. If our educational system is ineffective in delivering education to this group, what will happen within the next decade when the Hispanic population is projected to overtake the system? Giselle Fernandez’ recent Huffington Post article dubbed The Latino Education Imperative opens our eyes to this dilemma:

The stats say it all and cast the same frightening projection: By 2020, Latinos are expected to represent close to 25 percent of the country’s 18-to-29-year-old population. In ten years, nearly ten million Latinos will be 15 to 24 years of age, accounting for nearly a quarter of the total US college-age population.”

These facts are cause for great concern among us. So what are Latino community leaders doing about it? Facing the facts is not easy, especially for many school districts where the student population is shifting to reflect more of a diverse demographic, more so than a decade ago. What educators design and deliver within the next decade will decide America’s future for the next fifty years. So what quality of life and culture will our children inhabit? Will Latinos be an undereducated and dependent class or an enlightened and competitive one in the ever-changing global markets?

The educational system cries out for more money to improve education. This has been the cry for the past 30 years plus, and we’ve seen no national measurable results to justify more. We can no longer wait for problems to arise then counter them with ineffective measures. We must take a proactive, and at times an unpopular stance, to effect change and correct the current system. Therefore, we don’t need managers of old systems, what we desperately need is more innovative leaders to advocate, experiment and introduce new systems of learning. A starting point is drawn from California’s Monterey County whose Hispanic student population is listed at 73%, while Soledad Union School District Hispanic population lists at 94%. Most school districts similar to Monterey’s are quickly making changes to their educational delivery systems to meet this growing trend by adapting their curriculum and hiring more bi-lingual teachers to talk to and orient parents to how their child’s educational system works.

What role should Latinos and others play in our educational system? At this point a desperate one! We need to summon not just the educational leaders together but leaders from the various genres of culture. We need the faith and business communities to step up, and collaborate to create innovative strategies for new educational systems. I’ve always been an advocate for creating learning centers in faith-based organizations who employ educated staff with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree. Many immigrants and their children attend church faithfully each week. Why not create learning and tutoring centers at these locations? Immigrants have tremendous respect and trust in their faith leaders, and would follow their vision of education. A connection and dialogue with the faith community wouldn’t hurt education but perhaps add wisdom to the current strategy. In addition, business establishments can also add to learning by inspiring their best employees to give their time and talent to local educational centers to mentor, inspire and tutor marginal students. The business community can also create learning centers with an internship program to teach workforce principles. In my experience, Hispanics are more prone to “hands-on” learning; therefore, an interactive approach to learning can enhance their learning experience. Education in the future must seek community oriented solutions rather than the centralized-status-quo mindset that currently exists.

What are your solutions to the emerging Latino educational crises in America?